Posts tagged house

Discover The Masterpiece Hidden In La The Hollyhock House By Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

Frank Lloyd WRIGHT / Archive Specifications for Ranch House for Mr and Mrs 1955

[Archive]: Specifications for Ranch House for Mr. Randall Fawcett, Merced County, California. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect. Author: WRIGHT, Frank Lloyd Title: [Archive]: Specifications for Ranch House for Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect Publication: Los Banos, California: [circa 1955]. Blueprint reproduction of typescript, on rectos only, with manuscript corrections, deletions, and emendations. 28 x 23 cm (11 x 9 in), housed in binder. The plan for the building process is outlined in depth, including the materials to be used, the distribution of the drawings, the order of construction of various parts, etc. Of interest are three loose typed carbons, on legal-size paper, detailing the makeup of the family and their proposed living situation, so the design of the house could conform to their needs. These include the height and weight of the owners, the ages of the children, the dining areas porch must be screened, many insects! , bedrooms (the two boys can room together, girls need separate bedrooms since there is a seven year age difference), etc. Of all the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed structures in California, the Randall Fawcett House is in one of the most improbable locations. It’s not in a city or even a town. Instead, it’s situated in the middle of farmland outside the town of Los Banos, California. You might think that its original owners heeded Wright’s advice about choosing a location to go as far away from cities as they could – and then go 10 miles farther, but the reason it’s there is simpler than that. Randall “Buck” Fawcett was a star college football player, drafted by the Chicago Bears in 1944. When his father became ill, he changed his plans and moved back home to California’s Central Valley to run the family farm. He met Frank Lloyd Wright while he and his wife Harriett were taking an architecture course at Stanford University. Wright designed the Fawcett House in 1955 and construction was completed in 1961, two years after Wright’s death. It was the third-to-last California residence created by the famous architect. The house has six bedrooms and 4.5 baths and is a spacious 3,800 square feet of living space sitting in the middle of 80 acres of farmland. It’s constructed using battered concrete block, a technique that creates a wall that slopes inward as it rises. It’s a long, flat house that mimics its surrounding landscape. The layout includes a midsection with two wings at 60/120-degree angles. Inside, the concrete floor is inscribed with triangles, a geometric feature that also appears in cut-out wood screens, lighting fixtures, and the fascia of the roof. The living room fireplace is a massive affair, 12 feet wide. The living area is an open-plan room, but the house has a formal dining room. Outside is a Koi pond and swimming pool. In July 2012, a full restoration of the Fawcett House was completed by architect Arthur Dyson in collaboration with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives, and members of the Taliesin Fellowship. An interesting document detailing an important architectural site in California. Today we offer a wide ranging inventory, from Modern First Editions to General Used Books to Rare Archival Collections. We are active members of. Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA). International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB). This listing was created by Bibliopolis. This item is in the category “Books & Magazines\Antiquarian & Collectible”. The seller is “betweenthecoversrarebooks” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Author: WRIGHT, Frank Lloyd
  • Publisher: Unknown
  • Year Printed: 1955
  • Binding: Softcover, Wraps

The Revolutionary Design Of Frank Lloyd Wright S Robie House The Birthplace Of Modern Living

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House Complex Paperback By Lesley Neufeld GOOD

Frank Lloyd Wright's Martin House Complex Paperback By Lesley Neufeld GOOD

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House Complex – Paperback By Lesley Neufeld – GOOD. Notes: Item in good condition. Textbooks may not include supplemental items i. CDs, access codes etc.. This item is in the category “Books & Magazines\Books”. The seller is “second.sale” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Brand: Unbranded
  • Language: English
  • Book Title: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House Complex
  • Author: Lesley Neufeld
  • ISBN: 0972482806

Frank Lloyd Wright S Fallingwater Inside The House That Forever Changed Architecture

House Tour Inside A Frank Lloyd Wright Home That S Like A Time Capsule

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976

USED IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, SET OF ORIGINAL RESTORATION BLUEPRINTS from 1976. PRINTS MEASURES 36″ x 24.5″. THESE WERE USED IN THE RESTORATION OF THE HILLS-DECARO HOUSE BY MY FATHER. 27 PAGES IN ALL, SEE PICTURE 2 & 3 FOR THE LIST OF DRAWINGS. ALL ARE PRESENT EXCEPT A-19 WHICH WAS NEVER THERE. THEY ARE SIGNED BY THE CODE & ORDINACE DEPT. OF OAK PARK AND ARE EMBOSSED WITH THE SEAL ON THE FIRST PAGE. SOME MINOR WEAR ON THE EDGES. A LITTLE HISTORY: THE E. HILLS HOUSE WAS DESTROYED BY FIRE IN 1976. FOR THE NEXT TWO YEARS, MY FATHER REBUILT THE HOUSE TO THE ORIGINAL FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT DESIGN AND BLUE PRINTS. THESE PLANS WERE DRAWN BY ARCHITECT JOHN TILTON. THE ONLY OTHER SET IS STILL WITH THE HOUSE. THIS SET WAS USED BY MY FATHER IN THE REBUILDING OF THE HOUSE. A RARE CHANCE TO OWN A UNIQUE PIECE OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HISTORY. THE HOUSE WAS RENAMED THE HILLS-DECARO HOUSE BY THE NATIONAL HISTORICAL PRESERVATION SOCIETY. I WILL BE LISTING SOME OTHER UNIQUE PIECES IN THE FUTURE. PLEASE LOOK AT THE OTHER GREAT ITEMS IN MY STORE. I DO NOT MARK MERCHANDISE VALUES BELOW VALUE OR MARK ITEMS AS “GIFTS” — US AND INTERNATIONAL GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS PROHIBIT SUCH BEHAVIOR. This item is in the category “Art\Art Prints”. The seller is “tomjr1955″ and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Features: original restoration blueprints
  • Region of Origin: oak park illinois
  • Item Width: 36 in
  • Size Type/Largest Dimension: Large (Greater than 30\
  • Production Technique: blueprint
  • Listed By: Dealer or Reseller
  • Item Length: 36 in
  • Item Height: 24.5 in.
  • Subject: Architecture & Cityscape
  • Size: Large
  • Material: blueprints
  • Culture: american
  • Print Surface: Paper
  • Print Type: BLUEPRINTS
  • Time Period Produced: 1970-1979
  • Date of Creation: 1970-1989
  • Artist: frank lloyd wright
  • Year of Production: 1976
  • Original/Licensed Reprint: Original
  • Style: ARCHITECTURAL
  • Theme: frank lloyd wright
  • Type: blueprints
  • Original/Reproduction: Original Print

Fallingwater A Frank Lloyd Wright Country House by Edgar Kaufmann (English) Har

Fallingwater A Frank Lloyd Wright Country House by Edgar Kaufmann (English) Har

Fallingwater is recognized worldwide as the paradigm of organic architecture and considered to be Frank Lloyd Wright’s domestic masterpiece. Here, in beautiful photographs, the first as-built measured plans and an intimate narrative, is the fascinating story of this masterwork. Considered Frank Lloyd Wright’s domestic masterpiece, Fallingwater is recognized worldwide as the paradigm of organic architecture. Here, in beautiful photographs, the first as-built measured plans, and an intimate narrative by a key figure, is the fascinating story of this masterwork. Fallingwater is the most famous modern house in America. Indeed, readers of the Journal of the American Institute of Architects voted it the best American building of the last 125 years! Annually, more than 128,000 visitors seek out Fallingwater in its remote mountain site in southwestern Pennsylvania. Considered Frank Lloyd Wright’s domestic masterpiece, the house is recognized worldwide as the paradigm of organic architecture, where a building becomes an integral part of its natural setting. This charming and provocative book is the work of the man best qualified to undertake it, who was both apprentice to Wright and son of the man who commissioned the house. Closely followed the planning and construction of Fallingwater, and lived in the house on weekends and vacations for twenty-seven years-until, following the deaths of his parents, he gave the house in 1963 to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy to hold for public enjoyment and appreciation. This is a personal, almost intimate record of one man’s fifty-year relationship to a work of genius that only gradually revealed its complexities and originality. With full appreciation of the intentions of both architect and client, Mr. Kaufmann described this remarkable building in detail, telling of its extraordinary virtues but not failing to reveal its faults. One section of the book focuses on the realities of Fallingwater as architecture. A famous building right from its beginnings (only partly because it was Wright’s first significant commission in more than a decade), Fallingwater has accumulated considerable publicity and analysis-much of it off the mark. Kaufmann outlined and dealt with the common misunderstandings that have obscured the building’s true values and supplied accurate information and interpretations. In another section Mr. Kaufmann provided an in-depth essay on the subtleties of Fallingwater, the ideology underlying its esthetics. A key element of this is the close interweaving of the house and its rugged, challenging setting, which he explicated in fascinating detail. The author maintained throughout the direct approach of one who knew and loved Fallingwater. As an apprentice and loyal admirer of the architect, Mr. Kaufmann was well attuned to the architecture. And as a retired professor of architectural history and frequent lecturer and panelist, he had considerable experience in presenting and interpreting Wright’s ideas. Thoroughly versed in the books, articles, drawings, and buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright, Mr. Kaufmann was eminently situated to place Fallingwater in that context. This unique record was presented in celebration of Fallingwater’s fiftieth anniversary. Special features of this volume include: numerous never-before published photographs of the house under construction, during its entire history, and of the family in residence; a room-by-room pictorial survey in full color taken especially for this volume; isometric architectural perspectives that explain visually how the house was constructed; and the first accurate, measured plans of the house as built. During Fallingwater’s design and construction, he often served as intermediary between his parents and Wright. Kaufmann joined the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, became editorial adviser to Encyclopaedia Britannica, and taught at Columbia University. Kaufmann was the author, editor, or contributor to several design and architecture books and wrote numerous articles. He served on the Editorial Board of the Architectural History Foundation. Table of Contents from: Fallingwater Introduction: The House and the Natural Landscape: A Prelude to Fallingwater by Mark Girouard Foreword: Fallingwater, Known and Unknown Recollecting Fallingwater: Drifting Toward Wright How Fallingwater Began The Faults of Fallingwater Living with Fallingwater Responsibilities Rewards and Opportunities Fallingwater in a New Role Entry and Main Floor: Pictorial Realities at Fallingwater: What Fallingwater Is–and Is Not Measured Drawings The Adaptability of Wrights Architecture Wright’s Systems–and Mutations Presenting Continuous Space Fallingwater in Its Setting Inside Fallingwater Upper Floors and Guest Wing: Pictorial Ideas of Fallingwater: Images What Images Do Not Tell Afterword: Fallingwater’s Future Acknowledgments Bibliography Index Photography Credits. ” — Booklist “An engaging, intimate, sumptuous appreciation of Wright’s 1936 house in Bear Run, Pennsylvania… [Kaufmann] is able to explain the intentions of architect and client, and writes with both feeling and critical knowledge, having lived in and with the masterpiece all his life. A work of loving scholarship, beautifully presented, Fallingwater is highly recommended for all collections. Excerpt from: Fallingwater Introduction: The House and the Natural Landscape: A Prelude to Fallingwater by Mark Girouard A charming drawing by Thomas Hearne shows Sir George Beaumont and Joseph Farington sketching a waterfall in the Lake District, sometime in the 1770s. Waterfalls were being visited and sketched all over the British Isles at this period. But although gentlemen of taste sketched waterfalls, they did not build houses by them, still less over them. Nonetheless, a continuous thread connects Sir George Beaumont, sketching his waterfall in the 1770s, to Edgar J. Kaufmann, commissioning Frank Lloyd Wright to build Fallingwater in the 1930s. Between them lies a gradual development of the romantic imagination, and of attitudes to the natural landscape and to the problem of how buildings should, or should not, be fitted into it. In the eighteenth century, when English travelers first began to appreciate natural scenery, and to tour the mountains, lakes, rocks, waterfalls, and wild places of the British Isles, their attitude was by no means uncritical. For them “nature” was the supreme arbiter, but by “nature” they understood a Platonic ideal that actual natural scenery did not necessarily live up to. They had come to their appreciation by way of art and poetry, and traveled with minds conditioned by the way artists had painted wild landscapes, or poets had written about them, in both cases selecting and adjusting in order to compose a picture or a poem. A guide to the Lake District, first published in 1778, set out to take tourists from the delicate touches of Claude, verified in Coniston Lake, to the noble scenes of Poussin, exhibited on Windermere-water, and from there to the stupendous romantic ideas of Salvator Rosa, realized in the Lake of Derwent. When looking at a view, travelers would pass judgment on it, and mentally readjust it if necessary. Scenery was condemned for being too simple or too bare. A landscape of heather and rocks needed trees to break its outlines and give it light and shade. “Mere rocks, ” wrote Thomas Whately in his Observations on Modern Gardening (1770), may surprise, but can hardly please; they are too far removed from common life, too barren and inhospitable, rather desolate than solitary, and more horrid than terrible. Rocks were improved by water falling over or running through them; this produced a broken light and a broken sound that was both picturesque and pleasing. Trees, rocks, and water joined together in the right proportions made up a picturesque composition. Conventions developed about what did, or did not, go with particular views or features. Some types of buildings harmonized with waterfalls: Whately, for instance, described with approval “an iron forge, covered with a black cloud of smoke, and surrounded with half-burned ore” next to the “roar of a waterfall” on the River Wye. It suggested “the ideas of force or of danger” and was perfectly compatible with the wildest romantic situations. But a regular house next to a waterfall was a solecism: it spoiled the picture because it had the wrong associations. Looked at the other way, a wild landscape coming right up to a house spoiled the house. “And while rough thickets shade the lonely glen, Let culture smile upon the haunts of men, ” wrote Richard Payne Knight in his poem The Landscape (1795). A house of any size needed a park, and a park while it should never be formal, had a character distinct from a forest; for while we admire, and even imitate, the romantic wildness of nature, we ought never to forget that a park is the habitation of men. ” (Humphry Repton, An Enquiry into the Changes in Landscape Gardening, 1806) So it came about that when eighteenth-century devotees of the picturesque painted or drew “the romantic wildness of nature they depicted it without domestic accompaniments; when they imitated it, they imitated it out of sight of their houses; and when they went to live in it, they inserted an intermediary zone of culture and cultivation between house and wilderness. Hafod in Wales, for instance, which was the most famous wild demesne in eighteenth-century Britain, was renowned for its waterfalls. But none of these was in sight of the house, which was built in a more pastoral setting of greensward and grazing cattle. Country-house owners whose property did not happen to contain waterfalls not infrequently constructed an artificial one. At Bowood, in Wiltshire, Lord Shelburne made one at the end of an artificial lake, after the model of a picture by Poussin. Lord Stamford”s new cascade at Enville in Staffordshire was described with enthusiasm by Joseph Heely: I think I never saw so fine an effect from light and shade, as is here produced by the gloom of evergreens and other trees, and the peculiar brightness of the foaming water. (Letters on the Beauties of Hagley, Envil and the Leasowes, 1777) But neither fall was in sight of the house. The most that was considered suitable to embellish a waterfall was a statue or inscription, perhaps to a departed relative or friend, suitable to the mood of gentle melancholy induced by the sound of water; or a seat from which to admire it. The latter had to be in the right mode, however, like that at the Leasowes, near Enville: a rude seat, composed of stone, under rugged roots. Unlike ordinary houses, castles, especially ruined castles, were also considered appropriate features in wild scenery. They definitely had the right romantic connotations. But sometimes castles were still lived in, and sometimes they needed to be rebuilt. Culzean Castle in Ayrshire, for instance, was an old fortified house on a cliff top overlooking the sea. Its position was superb, its family associations were valued, but as a house the building failed to meet the late-eighteenth-century standards of accommodation and comfort. Between 1777 and 1792 it was rebuilt to the designs of Robert Adam, but in his own individual version of a castle style, in sympathy with its site. The new house rose straight from the cliffs, like the old one. Culzean pioneered a fresh approach, based on the idea that the architecture of a new house could be adapted to fit it to a wild situation. In the early nineteenth century a number of such houses were built, on dramatic sites or in wild settings, even when there had been no house there before. Normally they were built in a castle manner, but some, like Dunglass in Haddingtonshire, were built in the classical style, though on an asymmetric plan and with a broken outline, to fit the site. Such houses continued to be built through the nineteenth century. In the 1870s the architect Richard Norman Shaw established his reputation by designing Leyswood in Sussex, and Cragside in Northumberland, on dramatic rocky sites to which the houses played up with fragmented plans, soaring verticals, and picturesquely broken roofs. Shaw was consciously continuing the picturesque tradition, but, on the whole, new houses in this kind of position were built comparatively seldom in the British Isles. When clients or architects did opt for a wild site it was usually an elevated one, with the house rising out of wild nature rather than melting into it. This was partly because such houses were built for people of position, who wanted their place of residence to have a degree of importance; but also because houses on higher land had a view, and enclosed low-lying situations were thought to be unhealthy. It was probably for these reasons that houses down by waterfalls were a rarity. There was one building type, however, that could appropriately be designed to melt into its surroundings. This was the cottage. An interest in natural scenery had almost inevitably led to an appreciation of the way in which nature worked on and weathered man-made structures. Ruins appealed to eighteenth-century eyes in part because they were usually overgrown with moss and creepers. Artists on the look-out for picturesque effects also began to take an interest in old cottages, particularly when they were so dilapidated that nature seemed to be taking them over, to the delight of the artist if not of the inhabitants. “Moral and picturesque ideas do not always coincide, ” as William Gilpin put it. (Observations on Several Parts of England, 1808) From the mid-eighteenth century onward similar effects, suitably adapted to cope with problems of keeping out wind and weather, began to be incorporated into new buildings. Thatched roofs, rough undressed stonework, and creeper-clad porches and verandahs made of untrimmed branches, often with the bark left on them, were especially popular. To begin with these elements were confined to buildings such as grottoes, hermitages, and bathhouses, which were built as features in a park rather than to be lived in. But by the end of the eighteenth century they were being used for residential cottages. These included elaborate cottages orn. Publisher Abbeville Press Inc. Imprint Abbeville Press Inc. Country of Publication United States. Subtitle A Frank Lloyd Wright Country House. Place of Publication New York. UK Release Date 1986-11-13. We’ve got this. At The Nile, if you’re looking for it, we’ve got it. This item is in the category “Books, Comics & Magazines\Books”. The seller is “the_nile” and is located in this country: AU. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • ISBN-13: 9780896596627
  • ISBN: 9780896596627
  • EAN: 9780896596627
  • Publication Year: 1986
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Language: English
  • Book Title: Fallingwater: a Frank Lloyd Wright Country House
  • Item Height: 330mm
  • Author: Edgar Kaufmann
  • Publisher: Abbeville Press Inc.,U.S.
  • Item Width: 241mm
  • Number of Pages: 190 Pages

Hills-decaro Frank Lloyd Wright House, Original 1 Of 1 Pencil Drawing, Framed

Hills-decaro Frank Lloyd Wright House, Original 1 Of 1 Pencil Drawing, Framed

Hills-decaro Frank Lloyd Wright House, Original 1 Of 1 Pencil Drawing, Framed

Hills-decaro Frank Lloyd Wright House, Original 1 Of 1 Pencil Drawing, Framed

Hills-decaro Frank Lloyd Wright House, Original 1 Of 1 Pencil Drawing, Framed

Hills-decaro Frank Lloyd Wright House, Original 1 Of 1 Pencil Drawing, Framed

USED IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, HILLS-DECARO FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOUSE, ORIGINAL 1 OF 1 PENCIL DRAWING, FRAMED & MATTED. FRAME MEASURES 33″ x 27″, DRAWING MEASURES 23″ x 17″. A LITTLE HISTORY: THE E. HILLS HOUSE WAS DESTROYED BY FIRE IN 1976. FOR THE NEXT TWO YEARS, MY FATHER REBUILT THE HOUSE TO THE ORIGINAL FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT DESIGN AND BLUE PRINTS. UPON COMPLETTION OF THE REBUILD, MY FATHER HAD THIS PIECE COMMISSIONED. THE DRAWING IS DONE IN PENCIL BY THE ARTIST HENNESSY, DATED AND SIGNED 1981. THIS IS THE ONLY PIECE. THIS IS AN ORIGINAL ONE OF ONE. A RARE CHANCE TO OWN A UNIQUE PIECE OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HISTORY. THE HOUSE WAS RENAMED THE HILLS-DECARO HOUSE BY THE NATIONAL HISTORICAL PRESERVATION SOCIETY. I WILL BE LISTING SOME OTHER UNIQUE PIECES IN THE FUTURE. PLEASE LOOK AT THE OTHER GREAT ITEMS IN MY STORE. I DO NOT MARK MERCHANDISE VALUES BELOW VALUE OR MARK ITEMS AS “GIFTS” — US AND INTERNATIONAL GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS PROHIBIT SUCH BEHAVIOR. This item is in the category “Art\Art Drawings”. The seller is “tomjr1955″ and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Features: Framed
  • Region of Origin: US
  • Size Type/Largest Dimension: Medium (Up to 30\
  • Production Technique: pencil drawing
  • Listed By: Dealer or Reseller
  • Subject: Architecture & Cityscape
  • Size: 33 x 27
  • Material: Pencil, Graphite
  • Culture: american
  • Time Period Produced: 1970-1979
  • Date of Creation: 1970-1989
  • Artist: Unknown
  • Year of Production: 1979
  • Style: MISSION, Realism
  • Original/Licensed Reproduction: Original
  • Signed?: Signed
  • Type: Drawing
  • Original/Reproduction: Original

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT ART GLASS OF THE MARTIN HOUSE COMPLEX By Eric NEW

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT ART GLASS OF THE MARTIN HOUSE COMPLEX By Eric NEW

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT ART GLASS OF THE MARTIN HOUSE COMPLEX By Eric NEW

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT: ART GLASS OF THE MARTIN HOUSE COMPLEX By Eric NEW. FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT: ART GLASS OF THE MARTIN HOUSE COMPLEX By Eric Jackson-forsberg – Hardcover BRAND NEW. 9.5×0.5×9.25 Inches. 9.3×9.3×0.7 Inches. Satisfaction is guaranteed with every order. I have changed my mind and would like to cancel/make changes to my order. We believe in providing our customers with an ultra-speedy service. To ensure this is achieved, all of our systems are fully automated so orders are transferred for processing within minutes. How long should I expect customer service will take to respond to my inquires? We aim to respond to all customers within 24-48 hours (Monday – Friday). My Address is wrong. Very sorry to hear that! So please confirm you have selected the correct address before placing your order. What do I do if I haven’t received my order? Rest assured, we have you covered. Here is what to do: While we aim to deliver your order in the time frame specified, transit delays outside of our control can occur. Because of this we would ask that you allow the following amount of time before contacting us about your late order(s): At Least 18 days for Orders delivered within the US and At Least 25 days for Orders delivered outside the US. Basically, in the event of your order being delayed or lost in the post, we will do our best to provide a suitable resolution. What type of payments do you accept? Zuber’s Policies Are As Follows. We carefully grade our items, so you should expect to receive the item in the condition as we have stated it in our listing, please see the’Condition’ section. Please do not expect anything beyond what is stated in our listings. New Items: Guaranteed to be in new condition and in their original packaging. For CDs this generally (but not always) means they will come in their shrink-wrap/plastic. Used Items: Please see our description in each listing for details regarding particular items. The item you receive may not exactly match the photo, but will contain the same content. How quickly will I receive my item. Occasionally, orders are delayed a little longer. Can you tell me more about a particular item? We are unable to provide any additional information or guarantee that you will receive anything in addition to what is described in our listing. Carefully reading the item’s description details should answer most questions that you may have. The images supplied on our listings are intended as a guide only. Meaning that we did not take the picture. With this in mind it isn’t always possible for us to guarantee that you will receive the exact cover shown. You should receive the item described in our listing, but the cover could vary. Will you accept lower amounts/offers for your items? A Return must authorized by first contacting us. Then we will provide you with either a return label or specific instructions for mailing the item back. Do Not refuse the item when you receive it. Do Not mark the item as’Return to Sender’. United States Return requests must be within 30 days of receipt of the item. International Return requests must be within 14 days of receipt of the item. With their original packaging and accessories included with the return. We will then diligently work to find the best solution. What do I do if I have received a faulty product or the wrong item? Our aim is to deliver quality products to all of our customers. New items must be still sealed (if they originally were). We will provide you with a pre-paid return label. To ensure a speedy resolution please enclose the following in your correspondence. Images of the faults/defects and/or ISBN/UPC of the incorrectly received item. Explanation of what you received vs what you expected to receive. What do I do if I receive a damaged item? In the event that your order arrives damaged, please accept our apologies. Please ensure you provide us with your order number and images of the damaged item. Images must depict the damage you are discussing. The images you send must also include images of the packaging the item arrived in. YOUR ONE STOP SHOP FOR ALL KINDS OF SPECIAL FINDS. We offer a very large selection of competitively priced New & Used items. We look forward to serving you! This item is in the category “Books & Magazines\Books”. The seller is “zuber” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South Africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Republic of Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Montserrat, Turks and Caicos Islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei Darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French Guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Liechtenstein, Sri Lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macau, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Vietnam.
  • ISBN-10: 0764951505
  • Publication Name: Pomegranate
  • Type: Hardcover
  • ISBN: 9780764951503
  • EAN: 9780764951503
  • Book Title: Frank Lloyd Wright : Art Glass of the Martin House Complex
  • Item Length: 9.3in.
  • Publisher: Pomegranate Communications, Incorporated
  • Publication Year: 2009
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Language: English
  • Item Height: 0.7in.
  • Author: Julie Sloan
  • Genre: Architecture
  • Topic: Design, Drafting, Drawing & Presentation, Historic Preservation / General, Criticism, Regional, Methods & Materials
  • Item Width: 9.3in.
  • Item Weight: 26.8 Oz
  • Number of Pages: 96 Pages